N00b Monday: In the Round

My apologies for the late post. I’d rather give you a full post late than a half-assed post on time.

This week, because a few people have expressed a curiosity in it, we’re going to learn how to crochet “in the round” with that Universal Crocheted Staple: the Granny Square.

Have the following with you:

  • A crochet hook
  • Worsted weight yarn
  • scissors

To make this item, you’ll need to know:

*What we in the States call a dc and what my friends in the UK call a dc are two different stitches. This is the US definition, because it’s what I know.

Crochet is generally done either of two ways: in rows, as in two weeks’ ago’s post, or in rounds. With rows, you work one row at a time, back and forth. With rounds, you start in the middle and work your way around outward (though not necessarily in a “round” shape; squares, triangles, hexagons, and more are still made what’s called “in rounds” or “in the round”.

When we worked in rows two weeks ago, we made a bunch of chains and then we put single crochet stitches in the second chain from the hook, and worked our way across in a row. We’re starting with chains again, but this time we’ll be joining to the very first chain we made, using a slip stitch.

Like this.

There are about as many variations on granny squares as there are crocheters. For our tutorial today, we’re going to use this pattern to make a basic, monochrome granny square.

Granny Squares are considered the “meat-and-potatoes” of crocheting because of their versatility. Squares can be sewn together to make scarves and afghans, as well as sweaters, hats, purses, skirts, and more!

The pattern says: What that means:
Chain 4, (work all of the following sts in the 4th ch from the hk) Make four chain stitches. All of the following stitches for this round are going to be worked in the fourth chain from the hook (in other words, the first chain you made).
2 dc, * ch 1, 3 dc, repeat from * twice more, ch 1. Make 2 double crochet stitches in the stitch previously mentioned (the first chain you made). * Make a chain stitch, do three double crochet stitches. Do what is said after the asterisk twice more: make a second chain stitch, do three double crochet stitches, then do a third chain stitch and a third set of 3 double crochet stitches. Make one chain stitch.
Join with sl st in top of beg ch 4. Join with a slip stitch to the top of the beginning set of four chain stitches.

If you made it according to the pattern, then it should look like this:
Click for larger view

It doesn’t look very much like a square at all yet, and it won’t until we start to shape the corners.

The pattern says: What that means:
Ch 3, turn the piece over. Make 3 chain stitches, then turn your work-in-progress over.

These first three chains are what’s called turning chains. They fill in the same amount of space as a double crochet, which is why at the beginning you only did two doubles. The same is going to happen now, for Round 2:

The pattern says: What that means:
RND 2: (2 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in next ch 1 sp. For our second round, make 2 double crochet stitches in the nearest space made when you made a chain stitch in the last round. Then make 2 chain stitches, and in the same space do 3 more double crochet stitches.

Like so:
Click to see larger view.

Continuing on…

The pattern says: What that means:
* (3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in next ch 1 sp. Repeat from * twice more. In the next space made when you made a chain stitch, make 3 doubles, then 2 chains, then 3 doubles again in the same space. Then, do what’s after the asterisk 2 more times: in the next space made when you made a chain stitch, do the same as the first time by making 3 doubles, then 2 chains, then 3 doubles in the space. Then, finally, in the last space made by a chain, do the same thing once more: 3 doubles, 2 chains, 3 doubles.
Join with sl st in top of beg ch 3. Join with a slip stitch to the top of the first set of 3 chains that you made at the beginning of this round.

If all went according to the directions, it should look something like this:
Click for larger view

The pattern says: What that means:
Ch 3, turn the piece over. Make 3 chain stitches, then turn your work-in-progress over.
RND 3: 2 dc in next open space on the side of the square. For our third round: make two double crochet stitches in the next open space on the side of the square (the gap between the sets of double crochets you made in the previous round).
(3 dc ch 2, 3 dc) in the next open space on the corner of the square. In the next open space–the one on the corner of the square–make 3 doubles, then 2 chain stitches, then 3 doubles.
* 3 dc in next side space. (3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in next corner space. Repeat from * twice more. Make 3 double crochet stitches in the next space on the side. Then at the next space on the corner, make 3 doubles, 2 chains, and three doubles. Everything I just said following that asterisk, do two more times.
Join with sl st in top of beg ch 3. Join to the top of the first set of three chain stitches (which you made at the beginning of this round) using a slip stitch.

So, if everything came out right, you get this:
granny4.jpg

At this point, you can finish off and weave in your ends. If you wish, you can continue to make the square bigger and bigger. The pattern directions explain how:

The pattern says: What that means:
Ch 3, turn the piece over. Make 3 chain stitches, then turn your work-in-progress over.
FOR ANY ADDITIONAL ROWS:
Work 3 dc in each open space on the side of the square and work (3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in each corner space.
make three double crochet stitches in each open space on the side of the square (that is, any non-corner space made between groups of double crochets in the previous round) and in each corner space make 3 double crochets, 2 chains, then 3 more double crochets.
To begin a new row, always ch 3 and turn the square over. To begin a new round, always make 3 chain stitches and then turn your work in progress over. What the pattern doesn’t say: the set of 3 chains is a substitute for a double crochet stitch, so at the start of the round only do two doubles in the side space.
To end each row, do a sl st in the top of the beg ch 3. To end each round (note that the pattern says “row” but means “round”), do a slip stitch in the top of the set of 3 chains you made when you started the round.

So there you have it: a granny square! Next N00b Monday we’ll talk about switching colors while crocheting, and practice by making multicolor granny squares. Until then, keep practicing by making a bunch of these squares. You can make them all the same color, you can mix it up and do some in one color and some in another–whatever you like! Later on, we’ll sew them together to make a bag.

Is there something you want to learn about on N00b Monday? Post your questions and I’ll do the best I can to answer them. If I can’t, I’ll try and find someone who can. So long for now!

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4 Comments

Filed under crochet, directions, links, n00b Monday

4 responses to “N00b Monday: In the Round

  1. This is a very good tutorial. I can’t tell you how many granny square blankets I’ve made. My favorite is the neverending square when you start it and keep going and going. One year everyone in my family got a big square blanket for Christmas.

  2. Pingback: N00b Monday: Switching Colors « Stuff Peasie Made

  3. 30 years ago when I learned how to…your way is the way I made a granny square…with the turning. So many other directions call for the slipping to the next, or beginning a new color round, without the turning. The turning makes it a double sided piece; without it, you’ve got your “right” side and your “wrong” side. I haven’t made your kind of square in years, and I was looking for a refresher cuz I sorta forgot how…so thanks much for the post. I believe this is the BEST way to granny!!! thanks for the directions. Donna

  4. Terri Hileman

    I appreciate your website and have a question.

    I have made a foundation chain and crocheted three double crochets in each chain. This makes a spiral. How do I continue to make the spiral larger around?

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